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BUYING PROCESS

Apartments & Villas

A private villa with a swimming pool is the dream for many buyers, but apartments have a lot of going for them too.I enjoy most of your articles,the articles are so nice for readers. you can buy my watches here breitlingreplica.co.uk.

Most Turkish people live in apartments but developers are also now building more apartment complexes aimed specifically at foreign buyers in all the main resorts. These new developments are typically higher quality with more attention to fixtures and details.

Apartments are an increasingly popular choice with foreign buyers for a number of reasons. Firstly, they are normally cheaper than villas, making it easier to raise the necessary finance. They are also more convenient as general maintenance and communal gardens are normally looked after for you. Apartment complexes may also have security and shared facilities such as a swimming pool and tennis courts. This makes them particularly popular holiday-lets, and they can provide excellent rental returns.
Communial services and maintenance are paid for by a monthly service charge, which is set at the beginning of the year. Known as an aidat in Turkish, this monthly charge may also include the cost of fuel, oil or coal if the apartments have communal heating in the winter. There is often a caretaker, or kapıcı, living on-site who takes care of maintenance and the day-to-day running of the buildings.

The main drawback to apartments is that they offer less privacy and less space than a house, typically 80-125 m². Private outdoor areas are often limited to a balcony or small terrace.

Prices vary between apartments in the same block. Units on the top floors may have better views and sell at a considerable premium. However, being on the top floor is very inconvenient if there isn’t a lift. On the other hand, ground floor apartments may be darker and less secure, although direct access to a garden or communal area can add significantly to their value.

Villas are available for sale in all the coastal resorts. Naturally, they vary greatly in size, facilities and quality of build. Some are little more than concrete boxes, while other building companies are producing high-quality properties with luxuries, such as marble flooring, air-conditioning and infinity pools.
Although they offer a greater degree of privacy, and generally have a garden, often with a swimming pool, villas can be expensive to maintain, particularly if they are empty for most of the year. Villas are also less secure than apartments, although property crime is quite rare in Turkey. You may also have to employ a management company, adding to your costs.
Buying a detached or semi-detached villa on a complex removes many of the drawbacks mentioned above. The property is looked after while you are not there, and you benefit from shared facilities like tennis courts and large swimming pools. In many areas, villas on complexes are easier to rent as families on holiday prefer to stay somewhere with these facilities.

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Avoiding The Currency Blues

Although a dream for many, buying a property overseas can turn into a nightmare if vital parts of the buying process are neglected.
You would never dream of buying a house in the UK without knowing how much you were going to finally pay. So why, when buying abroad, is this exactly what many property buyers do? Whether buying a Turkish property outright or in installments, the purchase may involve changing your heart earned cash into a foreign currency, probably euros. Unfortunately no one can predict the exchange rate as many economic and political factors constantly affect the strength of the pound. Exchange rates are constantly moving and there is no guarantee that they will be in your favour when you need your money, so it is vital that you protect yourself against these movements. A lack of proper forward planning could cost you thousands of pounds.

The affect the exchange rates can have on the cost of your property can be seen if you look at what happened to the euro in the first ten months of 2004. Sterling against the euro was as high as 1,5279 and as low as 1,4096. This means that if you were buying a property worth € 200,000 it could have cost you as little as £ 130,898 or as much as £ 141,884,  a difference of £ 11,000.
It is possible to avoid this pitfall by buying and fixing a rate for your currency ahead of time through a forward transaction. This is the Buy Now, Pay Later option and is ideal if you still have some time to wait before your money is due overseas or if you are waiting for the proceeds from the sale of your UK property. Usually a small deposit will secure you a rate for anywhere up to 2 years in advance. By doing this, you will have the currency you need at a guaranteed price and know exactly how much your dream home is costing.
If, however, you need to act swiftly and your capital is readily available then it is most likely that you will use a spot transaction. This is the Buy Now, Pay Now option where you get the most competitive rate on the day. Another option available if you have time on your side is a limit order. This is used when you want to achieve a rate that is currently not available. You set the rate that you want and the market is then monitored. As soon as the rate is achieved, the currency is purchased for you.
However, many of us do not have the time or the expert knowledge to be able to confidently gauge when the foreign currency rates are at their most favourable. This is where a foreign exchange specialists can help. As an alternative to your bank, foreign Exchange specialists can offer you extremely competitive exchange rates, no commission charges and lower transfer fees. This can mean considerable savings on your transfers.
Even when you have both your property you must not forget about foreign exchange. It is likely that you will need to make regular transfers from the UK, whether for mortgage payments, maintenance expenditure or transfering pansions or salaries, and using a foregin Exchange specialist can make sure that you get more of your Money each time, even on small sums. The high-street banks typicly offer their customers a tourist rate of Exchange due to the small amounts that you are transfering. Further more, banks will generally charge a wiring fee of £ 10-£ 40 for every transfer that you make. Many will also levy a commission charge of about 2 %, which amounts to an extra £ 10 on a £ 500 transfer.
Foreign Exchange specialist, on the other hand, are able to give a commercial rate of Exchange regardless of the amount that you transfer. They also charge a lower fee (typicly £ 5 - £ 15) and no commission regardless of the size of the payment. The buttom-line saving when using a currency broker instead of a bank can be sizable, as illustrated by the example opposite.

Buying Off Plan

Buying off-plan has advantages for the purchaser, but stick with a company that has a good track record of previous developments.
Buying off-plan is increasingly popular in Turkey, as elsewhere. As the name suggests, this method of purchasing involves making a commitment to buy a property that has yet to be built. Selling off-plan is popular with developers as it reduces the financial risks of a project. This advantage is passed on to the buyer as a discounted price, often significantly below the market value of the completed property. In a country like Turkey where property prices are rising rapidly, the buyer also benefits from the growth of his capital investment during the building period. Over a typical building period this can amount to 15-20% or more.
The buyer bases their decision to purchase off-plan on information provided by the developer or estate agents. This information should include a detailed description of the location; a site plan and details of communal facilities and a floor plan and building specifications. There should also be a schedule for when the various stages of the construction will be completed.
The buyer then secures the property by paying a deposit, typically 10-15% of the total price, at the time of entering into a contractual relationship with the developer. As with any type of legal contract, it is wise to have an independent Turkish solicitor examine the document before signing. They will also check that the developer either owns the land or has authority to develop on the land, and that all the necessary planning permissions are in place.
Generally speaking, off-plan contracts set out the builder’s responsibilities and the schedule of payments. Payment is usually in installments and may be due on dates specified in the contract. Alternatively, payments may be linked to the completion of particular stages of the building process. This gives the buyer security, allowing them to withhold payment if work has not been completed, or if the work is not to the standard specified in the contract. It is a very good idea to personally inspect the property before releasing the final payment, as getting a builder back once the last instalment is paid can be difficult. As an added incentive to get the job done on time, some developers are now including a penalty clause, with payments made to the purchaser if the building isn’t completed on time. By law construction companies must give a 5-year guarantee on materials.
It is a good idea to opt for a developer who has already completed several similar developments, and, if possible, visit one of them for a look around. While you are there, you may even get the chance to talk to one of the owners. Although a good track record doesn’t provide a guarantee, it does give an indication that the developer is reputable and it also gives you an idea of the standard of their work. You can also ask your solicitor to check whether the developer is registered with the local chamber of commerce, although, once again, this is no guarantee.

It is also important for your solicitor to check the title of the land on which the development is taking place. Ideally, the land should be owned by the developer, as this removes the chance of a disagreement between the builder and the land owner affecting the progress of the development. If the land is owned by a third party, your solicitor will have to be satisfied that there is a clear and legally-binding agreement between the two parties, or that the developer has a power of attorney to sell the properties on behalf of the land owner.
If the property you are buying off-plan is part of a complex, you should ask for a copy of the complex rules and enquire about service charges.

COOPERATIVES

Without a mortgage system the only way many Turkish people can afford a house, or holiday home, is to buy into a cooperative development. “Construction cooperatives”, as they are officially known, are a recognised legal entity, which can buy land, build and act on behalf of its members. Similar to the off-plan concept, when someone joins a cooperative they make staged payments, often over a period of many years, towards the construction of the project. As a member they own a clearly defined part of the development, and a share of any communal facilities. However, actual title deeds to the individual properties are only issued when the entire development is finished and the members decide to dissolve the cooperative. Not being able to have a title deed for such a long time puts most foreign buyers off buying into cooperatives.
Many solicitors and estate agents also recommend against buying into cooperatives because of the potential for disputes between the various parties (the cooperative, the builder and the land owner) involved, and the possibility that construction costs on such large projects can escalate beyond initial estimates. These are not issues for concern if you buy a property on a completed cooperative development, where individual title deeds have been issued.
Properties on well-established cooperative developments can be excellent value for money. However, the poor quality of the buildings can mean that an extensive refit is necessary. Remember to get a quote for any necessary work before committing yourself. You may also find that cooperative properties are closer together and have less privacy than developments aimed at foreign buyers.

Cooperatives sometimes have excellent facilities, such as a swimming pool, cafés and shops, which are paid for by a monthly or annual service charge. Most of your neighbours will probably be Turkish families, which is perfect if you want to immerse yourself in the local culture. Remember to check the rules of development, the service charges and any other responsibilities of the individual property owners before proceeding with a purchase.

 

Estate Agents

TURKISH ESTATE AGENTS

Whatever type of property you decide to buy, you will probably use the services of an estate agent. A good estate agent will have a wide choice of properties and can provide valuable insights into the local market. Contacted in advance, they can arrange for you to view a number of properties in a limited space of time. But the services offered by most Turkish estate agents go far beyond those you would expect in the UK. They typically provide help with travel arrangements and residence permits, legal advice and, once you have bought the property, help buying furniture and getting the utilities connected. Many also provide a management service, should you want to rent out your property. Although many people use the solicitor recommended by their estate agent, you may feel more comfortable with an independent Turkish lawyer looking after your interests.
The recent property boom in Turkey has seen an explosion in the number of estate agents. Completely unregulated until very recently, many of the “estate agents” selling property were driving taxis or selling carpets last month. Make sure that you approach a well-established company with offices and a track record in the local area. Don’t make assumptions about a company based on their website alone. Ask for references from previous clients and check that the agent has taken and passed newly introduced estate agent’s fake rolex exam.
Reputable estate agents have started organising themselves into local associations in one or two places, but as yet there is no nationwide trade association.
Turkish estate agents charge a set commission of 3% from both the buyer and seller.

UK ESTATE AGENTS

There are a growing number of UK-based companies selling Turkish property. These companies may offer a wider choice of property than Turkish agents in various different parts of the country. They generally have larger websites giving details of properties that are currently available. If you haven’t decided exactly where you want to buy this can be useful, saving you the time of contacting individual local estate agents in each area.
On the other hand, UK-based estate agents, particularly those who don’t specialize in Turkish property, may have a less complete local knowledge of the areas they are selling in. They may also have an incomplete knowledge of Turkish property law.
Finally, you should check on the commission being charged by the UK agent for their services, as this can, in some breitling replica watches cases, be higher than what you would pay a Turkish estate agent for the same property.

VIEWING TRIPS
Many estate agents and developers offer viewing trips to potential customers. These are usually 3-7 days length with the company typically organising airport transfers, an orientation tour of the area and viewings for a series of properties. Dinner and entertainment may also be laid-on in the evenings.
Viewing trips are a very cost effective way of looking at the property, with the cost of your flight and accommodation subsidised by the company. If you decide subsequently to purchase a property, most estate agents will also deduct the cost of the trip from the price. They are ideal if you have only limited time, or if you have decided to buy in a particular area or even a specific development. However, audemars piguet replica remember that going on a viewing trip puts you under no obligation to buy. Don’t allow yourself to be pressured in any way.

Getting Started

Before you begin your property hunt in Turkey you should decide exactly what you are looking for. This sounds obvious, but clearly identifying your goals before you start looking can save a lot of time later.
Firstly, are you  buying primarily for your own use or as an investment? Do you want a rental property or a holiday home? Are you looking for a peaceful rural retreat, or an apartment on a complex? Will you be using the property out-of-season? Do you need to be close to an airport? Will you have a car or can you rely on public transport? Do you want the company of other foreigners or would you prefer to immerse yourself in the local culture?
The answers to these questions will help you get off on the right track and find a property more easily. In order to focus your mind, it may be helpful to compile a list of exactly what you are looking for, and what you definitely do not want.
The coastal resorts are much more crowded in the summer and there is more traffic on the roads. On the other hand, public transport will be better in season, with more frequent buses and minibuses to the shops or beach. It may be harder to get around without your own transport in winter. Also, off-season many restaurants and shops close in the smaller resorts, leaving whole areas like ghost towns. There will be fewer foreigners around, if you want company. If you intend to use your property as a holiday home, these things may not trouble you. But if you plan to relocate perminantly they should definetely be considered.
If you are relocating permenantly then consider renting an apartment so you can get to know an area really well before taking the plunge. You may also need to consider access to medical care or good schools if you have children. At the very least you should spend a couple of weeks in the place you intend to buy, getting to know it and comparing to other areas.
Another excellent way to find out about an area is to talk to people who have already bought there. Most people will be only too happy offer advice. You can do this without even leaving home by joining one of the local forums that our springin up on the internet.

FINDING A SOLICITOR
It is advisable to have an indepentent Turkish solicitor look after your interests and make the necassary searches before embarking on any property transaction. Often buyers don’t see the need for a solicitor, and many sales go smoothly without one. However, there are many potential pitfalls in the buying process. Having said that, merely appointing a Turkish solicitor is not enough. It is essential to find one who has experience of property law and who has dealt with purchases involving foreigners before. Speaking english is also important, so you can communicate easily with one another.

ORGANISING THE FINANCING
Once you have set your budget, it is a good idea to organise the necasssary finansing, so the money for the purchase is ready should you decide to buy. Acting quickly is important due to strong demand in some areas and the rapid turn-over of properties. To avoid dissapointment you should have a deposit ready, and have arrangements in place for funding the rest of the purchase. For more information about the cost of buying see the buying costs section.

SETTING A BUDGET
Another important task before you begin looking for a property is to set yourself a budget. This should be realistic both in terms of your personal financial situation, but also with regard to actual prices currently being paid on the ground in Turkey. No use setting yourself the unrealistic goal of buying a luxury apartment with sea views for £ 15,000! Rather than wasting your time, consult the typical prices in the Properties for sale section of this website, which will give you an idea of the current prices being paid in each area. However, you should remember that prices are rising extremely rapidly in many resorts so these prices should only be used as an intial guide.
If you are buying a resale or old property it is important to include the costs of all necessary renovation work in your budget. The property should also be assessed by a builder or architect before embarking on the purchase, so you know what you are getting yourself into. Ask them to quote for the necassary work but be wary of underestimating the time and expense of whatever is involved. When setting your budget you should also factor in the costs involved in the purchase, such as legal fees. More details can be found at buying costs section.
If the property unfurnished you will also have to include the cost of furniture in your budget. Furniture is much cheaper than in the UK, but kitting out a whole villa or apartment from scratch can sitll be costly.

Land & Bulding

Buying a plot of land and having a property built on it is a popular option – although it won’t happen overnight
Some people decide to buy a plot of land and have a house or villa built on it. The availability of land suitable for building varies enormously from place to place. In some areas the supply of undeveloped land is nearly exhausted, with any available plots immediately snapped up by local developers. Elsewhere, for example where new areas have recently been opened up for development by municipalities, there is more choice. Needless to say, prices vary enormously depending on a multitude of factors, including location, access, availability and the density of building permitted on the land.
Building density relates to the base area of a building and does not include terraces, driveways or swimming pools. Maximum building densities vary from as little as 5% on agricultural land, to 25%, 30% or higher in urban areas. There may also be local restrictions on the height of buildings, particularly if it is close to the sea. If the land is in a conservation area additional restrictions may also apply.
Universal restrictions include a ban on owning land within 100 metres of the sea. Legislation introduced in 2003 allows foreign nationals up to 30 hectares of land in rural areas, although this law is currently being redrafted and it is widely expected that this limit will be reduced.
As part of their searcher, a solicitor will look into any land-use, planning and building restrictions that apply to a piece of land. They will also make sure that the boundaries are clearly defined and that the plot you are buying is where it is supposed to be. This may sound strange, but it is not unheard of for people to discover that the land they bought is not exactly where they thought it was. If the boundaries are unclear your solicitor may recommend employing a surveyor.
Like when you buy a villa or apartment, when you purchase land you will receive a title deed, or tapu. This describes the ownership of the land, its position, its size and its boundaries as they are recorded in the official land registry. Some isolated rural areas have not been surveyed by the Tapu ve Kadastro Genel Müdürlüğü, the government agency in charge of surveying. In these areas ownership is registered at the local level in the form of a traditional village deed, and there will be no official title deed at the land registry. Village deeds are legally recognised, although many solicitors warn against buying a property without an official deed, not least because difficulties can arise when the area is surveyed.
Before buying land in Turkey it is important to consider what is around. If you are planning to build on your land, it is likely that the person who owns a neighbouring plot is thinking the same. Consider carefully the effect of their building on your property. For example, will it overlook your house or block your wonderful sea view.

BUILDING
Before you can start building, you need to obtain the necessary planning permission. This requires submitting detailed plans of your proposed project to the municipal or provincial planning department.  For this you will need the help of a Turkish architect and a team of approved professionals. In some cases a geological report must also be commissioned.
When you receive planning consent your architect can draw-up a schedule of works. This includes details of every material to be used in the structure, from the concrete to the floor tiles and light-fittings. This document forms part of your contract with the builder.
Once this is completed you are ready to find a building company to quote for the work. Your architect may recommend a builder, but it wise to get quotes from several others too. Seek recommendations locally and also ask for references from previous clients. A contract, drafted or checked by your Turkish solicitor, should be signed by both parties before any work starts. The contract should detail payment terms, with staggered payments linked to the physical progress on the building. A typical payment schedule will include payments on signing the contract; on completion of the concrete structure; on completion internal and external works; on completion of the garden and landscaping, with a final payment due when the keys are handed over. If possible, negotiate for a small sum to be withheld for a certain period after the building is finished, in case any problems surface that require the builder’s attention. Any amendments to the original plans or additional expenses must be added to the contract and signed by both parties.

Some construction companies offer a complete service from purchasing the land to drawing up the plans; applying for the necessary planning permission; constructing the building and even sourcing the furniture. This type of package is very convenient, particularly if you don’t have the time to make regular visits. However, make sure that a clear contract is in place before you start.
Depending on the project, construction can take up to a year. However, in the coastal resorts a ban on building during the tourist season effectively shortens the year by four months, meaning things can take a lot longer. A scarcity of skilled workman in some of the resorts can also slow things down.
Once the building is complete, you or your builder will need to get an iskan raporu from the local authorities. This demonstrates that all permits and taxes have been paid, and all regulations followed.

News & Resale

New properties may be better built and have more facilities, but resale are often cheaper ad may have the best location.
Building standards have improved enormously in Turkey in recent years. These improvements are due to tighter building regulations and new inspection regime, brought in by the government in the wake of the devastating 1999 earthquake. Rising expectations on the part of Turkish buyers are also encouraging improvements, while more buildings are now being built to meet the higher demands of the foreign market too. Due to these improvements these resale properties, say over 3 years old, and newer apartments or houses. The main reason people choose older properties is because they are often cheaper then new-builds. Built first, they may also have the best position, nearer the sea or with an uninterrupted view. However, even in the coastal resorts, most resale properties were built according to local tastes. For example, they often have more rooms in a given area and may feel cramped. Opening up the space by removing internal walls can solve this, though you should consult an architect or builder before buying.
Be aware that some older apartments and villas may not meet the new building regulations, particularly for earthquake resistance. The quality of finishing may also be inferior to new-builds, and older resale properties often need extensive renovation, which must be factored into your budget. Once again, a local builder should be brought in to give you a quote before proceeding with a purchase.
Although labour and materials are far cheaper than in Britain, the cost of renovating can add up to the difference in price between an old and a new property. Competition from new-builds may mean that you have difficulty in selling an older property too.

Old Houses & Renovations

Renovation projects can be found in rural areas, as well as towns and cities like Ayvalık, Antalya and Istanbul.
Old houses are fairly rare along the southern coast of Turkey. This is because historically the coastal region was sparsely populated and comparatively poor, and there simply weren’t that many solidly built large houses. Traditional stone buildings are also expensive to construct and maintain, and impractical compared to the concrete homes that have replaced them. Unvalued by many Turkish people and without nay official protection until comparatively recently, the old buildings that did exist were left to fall down or be demolished. In some areas earthquakes have also contributed to this process. There are some notable exceptions where historic buildings survive in greater numbers, such as the old neighbourhoods of Antalya and the Aegean town of Ayvalık, but generally old buildings are hard to find along much of the Turkish coast.
Istanbul, on the other hand, has far more old properties. The wooden houses, or yalı, along the Bosphorus are highly sought after and extremely expensive. More affordable are the old apartments in the inner-city areas of Beyoğlu or Galata. In Cappadocia, in central Turkey, the local people have traditionally lived in cave houses, and these have become popular renovation projects in recent years.
Buying an old property can take far longer than a new one due to the complex ownership rights that are often encountered. It is common for old properties to be owned by several members of the same family. In such cases, each person will need to be present at the registry office, or to have given power of attorney to a solicitor acting on their behalf, before the sale can proceed. This can cause enormous practical problems, particularly if the various family members live in different parts of the country or even abroad.
Before proceeding with the purchase of an old property it is wise to have a builder or structural engineer check the building and quote for any renovation work. Despite low labour and material costs, renovating an old property is expensive. In houses over a certain age, all the wiring and plumbing will almost certainly need to be replaced-or there may not even be any! Major structural work is also not unusual.
Your solicitor will need to find out if the house is in a conservation area, or sit alanı. In these areas of archaeological or environmental importance there are strict controls on any kind of building or renovation work. Your plans may have to be passed by Çevre Koruma Kurumu, the government department in charge of managing officially protected areas, as well as the local planning committee. As with a newer resale property, your solicitor will also need to check that there are no outstanding debts against the title.

The Buying Process

Buying a property in Turkey can be very simple, but it is a good idea to be familiar with the main points of the procedure.
Most people are surprised at how straightforward and quick the buying procedure is in Turkey. Once everything has been agreed, a property transaction between two Turkish people can be completed in an afternoon. For a foreign buyer it takes significantly longer only because of the need for official permission from the military authorities. Below is an outline of the main parts of the buying process.

PROPERTY SEARCHES
Your solicitor will need to conduct a search at the registry office (tapu dairesi) to confirm that the property belongs to the seller, or that they have the authority to sell it for someone else. They will also check that there are no outstanding debts or charges, restrictive covenants or pre-emption right against the property. For both new and re-sale properties it is important to ascertain that all the appropriate planning regulations were followed and building permission was granted. The solicitor will also check that the property is not in a military land or property. You can also ask them to check on the status of adjoining land, if you are concerned about future development.
In normal circumstances all the searches and checks should take no longer than 3-4 working days.

BUYING COSTS
The costs of buying a property in Turkey are lower then in the UK. The main costs include a transfer tax of 3%, based on the declared value of the property. This is usually shared equally between the buyer and seller, although a different arrangement can be made and set down in the contract.
A register fee, also based on the value of the property, is paid by the purchaser when the deeds are transferred at the registry office. If you use a Notary Public, the fees are standard and vary from £100-£250 depending on the service provided.
If the sale was organised through an estate agent their standard commission is 3% of the sale price from both the buyer and the seller. This commission rate may be open to negotiate in some circumstances. Value added tax, or KDV in Turkish, only applies to properties bought at auction. You must also pay for compulsory earthquake insurance, which is about £35. Finally, don’t forget to take into account your legal fees. 

COMPLETION
Once you have received the go-ahead from the military authorities you can proceed with the actual transaction. This is usually conducted in the local land registry office (tapu dairesi), although you can also perform the transaction in a Notary Public, in which case the title deeds for the property will be officially changed in the land registry at a later time.
Performed in the presence of a land registry official, the transaction involves the current title deed holder, or their legal representative, giving consent for a new title deed (tapu) to be issued in the buyer’s name. By this point the money for the transaction should have already changed hands. An interpreter should be present to translate during the entire procedure, so you understand exactly what is going on.
As the legal owner, your name and details will now be on the title deed, a copies of which are given to you and kept at the registry office. Additional copies of the title deed can be ordered from the registry office for a small charge.

DECLARED VALUE VS. MARKET VALUE
You may notice that the value of the property on the official title deed, or tapu, is far lower than the actual price you paid for the property. Although illegal, under-reporting the value of property is a universal practice, which reduces stamp duty and annual property tax paid to the government. In fact, the declared value, particularly of an older re-sale property, may be less than 50% of the actual market value.
Although the government will inevitably crack down on this practice, it is widely agreed that this will not be for some time yet. Ie In the meantime, your seller won’t take very kindly to an attempt to declare the market value of the property and increase his tax bill.

DEPOSIT & CONTACT
After the initial searches have been completed, it is normal to pay a 10-15% deposit to show your commitment and to hold the property during the military investigation process. Payment of the deposit should be recorded in a contract, written in Turkish and translated into English, which is signed by both the buyer and the seller.
The contract will also give the agreed price for the property and also may include details of how the payment is to be made. Provisions for what happens in the event that the purchase does not go through should also be included in the document, which should be drafted by a Turkish solicitor experienced in property law.
Contracts for off-plan purchases will also contain other details, such as the payment schedule, the date of completion, a schedule of works and any guarantees.

GRANTING POWER OF ATTORNEY
Granting power of attorney to your solicitor or another trusted person allows them to act on your behalf. This can be particularly useful if you don’t have the time to return to Turkey at the points of the buying process that your presence is required. Of course, it also saves you spending money on air travel and accommodation.
A power of attorney can be drafted by a Turkish solicitor and will need to be notarised in your presence at the Notary Public. The document can also be drafted by a British solicitor, although it will then need to be ratified by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office before being sent to Turkey. This is a simple enough process but takes significantly more time than using a local solicitor. Turkish solicitors may also be more familiar with the various types of power of attorney that are required.

MILITARY PERMISSION
Foreign nationals buying property in Turkey must be approved by the military authorities. Before granting permission for the sale to proceed, the staff at the military headquarters will run background checks to make sure that you are a person of “good character”. This involves checking whether you have a record of serious criminal or terrorist activity. Minor offences should not generally count against you.
As part of the military permission process, the authorities also check that the property you intend to buy is not located in a military restricted zone. These areas are dotted across the country and may include land adjacent or near military bases or strategically important parts of the coast. The whole procedure usually takes about 12-14 weeks.

OBTAINING A TAX NUMBER
Once you have purchased a property you need to register with the local tax office who will issue you with a tax identification number. Your solicitor can perform this for you following the exchange of title.

TRANSFERRING THE MONEY
There are several options for transferring money to Turkey, aside from a briefcase full of cash (not recommended!). The best way is to open a Turkish bank account well before the date of completion. That way, you can transfer the funds for the purchase from your account in the UK by Priority Payment electronic transfer. You will need to go into your local branch and fill out a form, giving the name and address of the bank where the account is held; the account number and branch code. This transfer method costs about £25 and takes 3-5 working days, though sometimes considerably longer.
Then you will need to make a transfer from your Turkish account so that the money reaches the seller’s bank account on the day of completion. The transfer of title will not normally take place until the cleared funds are in the seller’s account.
Another alternative is to have your bank issue a banker’s draft, a form of cheque, which can be sent by courier or even taken in person to the beneficiary. Remember that banker’s drafts take time to clear once they have been paid into the beneficiaries account, so give yourself plenty of time.
Remember to transfer enough money to cover the costs involved in the purchase.

 
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